Home Insurance Advice

If you do not have coverage for the fair or full value of the owned property, you will not be able to get financial help from mortgage companies. A few tips can make your home insurance meet your needs:

Homeowners’ insurance isn’t cheap. People living in areas more prone to earthquakes, floods or high claim areas pay the highest coverage. Sometimes, high-risk residents are asked to pay thousands of dollars as annual premiums. However, this does not means that homeowners of secluded, suburban areas can buy a cheap policy. The basic policy for relatively out-of-the-way areas lies between 100-500 US dollars.

Many people restrain from purchasing homeowner’s insurance because of the expenses involved in it. Homeowner’s insurance is not a choice that you can make. It is absolutely necessary and you should not refrain from buying it. The best thing about this is that you can cut down its cost by following some steps.

1) You Security Alarm Helps Cut Down Premium Costs: By installing a burglar alarm in your house and connecting it with a police station can help you cut down your premium costs up to 5 percent. However, in order to avail this benefit, you will have to show the insurance company the contract paper. Smoke alarms can also make things easy for you. Usually, a smoke alarm is installed in all newly built houses but if you set a smoke alarm in an old house, you can save more than 8 percent on your premium amount. Keeping you away from fire is another benefit that they give. So get the alarms for your safety and cut down your insurance cost.

2) Increase Deductible To Decrease Premium: Just like any other kind of insurance, if you choose a higher deductible for your homeowner insurance, you will have to pay lesser premium. This is another simple and easy way to keep away from paying higher premiums.

3) Buy From the Same Insurance Company: Instead of buying your auto and health insurance policies from other companies, consider purchasing them from the same company where you have bought your homeowner policy. There are a lot of companies that allow a discount up to 10 percent to all their customers who buy multiple policies from them. In this way, you can save on two or more premiums and control your expenses considerably. Moreover, you will stay away from the hassle of contacting different companies in case of any incident.

4) Pay Back Your Mortgage Loans: People who repay their debts to mortgage companies have to pay smaller premiums. You may wonder why it’s so. The answer is downright simple. The owner who manages to pay back his loans to take possession of his homes is also capable of taking care of his home. Once you satisfy Mortgage Company, the insurance company will satisfy you.

End Note

In order to keep yourself away from any kind of trouble and to receive your insurance money in time, make sure that you have everything …

Do You Know What Bottled Water Has in It?

Bottled drinking water is pure, right? Not necessarily. Bottled water can be less pure than municipal tap water in some parts of the United States. In fact, bottled water can actually be municipal tap water. Two examples are Coca Cola’s Dasani brand and Pepsi Cola’s Aquafina brand.

What is bottled water?

“Description. Bottled water is water that is intended for human consumption and that is sealed in bottles or other containers with no added ingredients except that it may optionally contain safe and suitable antimicrobial agents. Fluoride may be optionally added within the limitations established.” The United States FDA

Who regulates what bottled water has in it?

The Federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulates bottled drinking water, which is classified as a “food”. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulates tap water. Amazingly, the EPA guidelines for municipal water are stricter than the FDA restrictions for bottled drinking water! You might buy bottled drinking water that is acceptable to the FDA but is not acceptable for use as ordinary bathroom tap water.

The FDA’s specific regulations for bottled water are found in Title 21 of the Code of Federal Regulations (21 CFR).

What are FDA standards?

Under the standard of quality (21 CFR, 165.110[b]), FDA allows certain levels of contaminants in bottled water.

Contaminants bottled water has in it.

1. Coliform. Coliform are rod-shaped bacteria, such as E. coli, that are normally present in the human intestine. The FDA says that bottled water may have up to 9.2 coliform organisms per 100 milliliters. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

2. Arsenic. Arsenic is a poison. The FDA says that bottled water may have up to 0.05 milligrams per liter of arsenic. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

3. Chloride. Chloride is a compound of chlorine, a substance used to disinfect tap water. The FDA allows up to 250.0 milligrams per liter of chloride in bottled water. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

4. Iron. Iron is a metallic element. Your body needs some iron, but not too much. The FDA permits bottled water to contain up to 0.3 milligrams per liter of iron. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

5. Manganese. Manganese resembles iron and is used in fertilizers. Bottled water may contain up to 0.05 milligrams per liter of manganese. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

6. Phenols. Phenols are corrosive, poisonous acidic compounds. Your bottled water may contain up to 0.001 milligrams per liter of phenols. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

7. Dissolved solids. “Dissolved solids” is a catch-all phrase. The FDA allows bottled water to contain up to 500 milligrams per liter of dissolved solids, of whatever type. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

8. Zinc. Zinc is a metallic element. Your body needs some zinc, but not too much. The FDA permits bottled water to contain up to 5.0 milligrams per liter of zinc. See 21 CFR 165.110[b].

9. Fluoride. Fluoride is purposely added to some bottled water. If so, the label should say so. In addition, bottled water that is not labeled as containing fluoride may contain up …